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Greenlight yourself!

5 Nov

“Greenlight yourself.”

–Charlie Todd

Do you remember when in order to start a business it required massive amounts of capital and labor intensive resources? Do you recall a time when writing a novel required securing  a publisher and producing massive amounts of hardcopy books? How about the time when recording an album or creating a film required an entire studio, mixers, professional producers, etc.?

Well, if you do remember these archaic times, guess what, they’re dead.

The internet and technology has dissolved and eroded all barriers of of entry for whatever creative channel we want to pursue, allowing each of us the ability to pursue our ultimate passions and creative dreams. In essence, creativity has been fully democratized. Do you care to start a business or tech company? There are hundreds of seed accelerators thanks to Y-combinator. Want to make a movie? Get on youtube or vimeo. Care to write a book or blog? Hop on wordpress, tumblr or even CreateSpace to self-publish. Want to build a website or mobile app on the fly? Outsource to some far away place through Odesk.com. How about record a rock album? There’s an iPad app for that ūüôā (see Gorillaz new album, The Fall).¬†Or maybe you wanted to invent a new kitchen or household product? There’s a bit of Quirky in all of us.

What’s holding us back then? Go ahead, greenlight yourself!

Greatist Manifesto

17 Oct

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I’m jazzed about this company, Greatist, and their manifesto. In fact, it’s who I am and the “why” I exist: To inspire others to seek their highest wellbeing. Companies like this empower their users and employees by pushing the next generation of health seekers and entrepreneurs forward, empowering people to achieve their highest purpose and to help obtain the most important gift of all:

Health

“He who seeks health, shall obtain it.”

Greatist also helps illustrate the concept discussed in my previous blog: The fusion of man and technology for optimal health. What health trends and companies are inspiring you?

Always going for glory!

Craig Steinfeld

More must-read health & fitness news and information at Greatist.

Stairs or escalator?

14 Apr

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It always amazes me how little decisions we make every single day can impact our health and societal health on a greater scale. The incremental choices, that we often view as trivial, end up amounting to the greater picture that comprises our health.

For instance:

To watch the latest reality show on television, or go outside for a walk?

To start the day with another soda, or opt for water?

To try incorporating more veggies in my diet, or sticking to fries only like I’m used to?

To snack on a twinkie, or eating fruit instead?

Maybe if we can tweak just a few little things about ourselves, the big picture of “health” and wellness would be less daunting.

Every decision we make, counts.

Craig E. Steinfeld

@CESteinfeld

(Special thanks to my brother, Alec @ALsteinfeld, for the image used and inspiration)

The real food groups

8 Mar

Let’s make something clear off the bat. The new “my plate” put forth by USDA as recommended food groups and daily allowances has come a long way from the old food “pyramid.” The new my plate is much more cohesive and appears to be less influenced by large industry. Fruits and vegetables make up 50% of recommended daily food intake. Grains and protein make up the other 50% with additional dairy as a side dish.

While the old pyramid showed pictures of the food groups through images of cheese, apples, steaks, etc., the new plate leaves much to be interepreted as far as specifcially what types of foods to eat within the given groupings. Clearly, there must be more to eating than blindly eating “fruits, veggies, meat, dairy,” right?

Common questions: ¬†What kind of veggies and fruits should I eat? Which cuts of meat are most healthful? Is dairy healthy for me? ¬†The “plate” ¬†put forth by the USDA leaves much to be interpreted.

My real food groups:

1. Green leafy vegetables:¬† Greens contain (most) all the vitamins and minerals you will ever need (magnesium, calcium, vitamin C, vitamin A, fiber to name a few) and are nature’s multivitamin. This means eat anything seasonal that you can find and throw it in your pastas, soups, eggs, and whatever else you cook. You can find seasonal greens year round. Kale, collard greens, spinach, arugula, chard & bok choy. Eat 3 cups of greens and you will probably live longer.

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2. Sulfur rich vegetables: These are sometimes called cruciferous veggies and they’re absolutely essential for proper brain function, immune support, cancer prevention, detoxification, proper organ function (liver and kidney) and additionally they power mitochondria, the energy powerhouse of every cell in your body. These veggies include onions, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, onions, and garlic to name a few.

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3. Colorful vegetables: You may have heard about phytonutrients, polyphenols, and antioxidants, well eating some colorful veggies will be the ultimate way to ensure you are reaching your daily antioxidant levels. A few of my favorites are bell peppers, yams & sweet potatoes (loaded with potassium, and retinol by the way), tomatoes, carrots, grapes, and lemons (another great detox food).

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4. Wild Fish:¬†Fish contain omega-3 fatty acids (another hot one you’ll hear about in the news). There are plant-based ways to obtain omega-3 fats, but they do not contain, DHA, a critical fatty acid that helps develop the brain, jaws, and keep the myelin functioning well to prevent aging and cognitive decline. Important caveat, the smaller the fish, the less likely chance you’ll have to worry about mercury contamination due to bioaccumulation. Stick with wild caught salmon, mackerel, anchovies, sardines, and herring. If you do not have access to fish, then try supplementing with a molecularly distilled fish oil. I once read a bumper sticker in Santa Monica that read: “Eat fish. Live Longer.”

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5. Grass fed, pastured meats and eggs:¬†Here is where you will get the bulk of your protein, creatine, conjugated linoleic acid, omega-3 fats, and the loads of iron. Why grass fed? Because the meat industry is a unscrupulous ¬†(see Food, Inc., anything by Michael Pollan or Marion Nestle) and it’s probably best to avoid factory farmed meats due to hormones, steroids, and risk of food borne illness. ¬†You may even try incorporating ¬†occasional organ meat in the diet as it is extremely rich in minerals, creatine, coenzyme q10, iron, otherwise hard to obtain nutrients (See: Mark’s Daily Apple on Offal).

While vegan living may supply sufficient nutrition with extreme care to diet, eating the occasional animal protein remains the surest way to prevent sever nutritional deficiencies and keep energy levels high.

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6. Seaweed and sea veggies: There’s a reason the Japanese have an average lifespan of like 150 years old (or 80-something) and they might be on to something by eating loads of sea vegetables in their diet. Why are these so critical? They contain not only iodine, but they are essential for removing toxins from the body (which whether we believe it or not are all exposed to on a daily basis through pollution or otherwise), proper functioning of the thyroid, and insulation of the myelin to prevent cognitive decline. Throw some into a soup, stir fry, make a seaweed salad or even toss some in your eggs.

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Noticeably absent: Dairy and “complex carbohydrates.” ¬†Dairy inflames the body’s mucous membranes and casein (an amino acid found in all dairy) has been linked to increased cancer and tumor growth (see: The China Study¬†for reference). Areas of the world that do not consume dairy actually have less incidences of osteoporosis and less gastrointestinal cancer rates as well.

On carbohydrates: They are fine in moderation, but the problem being that most are difficult to digest due to the amino acids gluten and leptin and, almost all are genetically modified (wheat, soy, corn). Stick to brown rice, lentils, rye, quinoa, and occasional wheat but these for me are on the outside looking in of my real food groups.

I’ll be delving deeper into each of these food groups via my blog and potentially even crafting an entire book based on the above categories with recipes as well. Go ahead, superfood yo’self!

What are your “real” food groups?

Always going for glory!

Craig E. Steinfeld

@cesteinfeld

cesteinfeld [at] gmail dot com

Food Advocates: Aren’t we fighting the same fight?

24 Feb

Se√Īor Bacon or Monsieur Tofu?

A growing trend in the food world continues to amaze me. ¬†People involved in the “organic,” local, slow or whatever “food movement” they define themselves as a part of (myself included) are either for eating as much animal protein as possible, or for eating zero animal product at all (paleo vs vegan). ¬†Those in favor of eating animals believe that it sets the world on a more “sustainable” course and improves everyone’s health. Those against eating animals believe, well, the same thing. ¬†Both argue the same outcomes with diametrically opposed means and there substantial evidence backing both claims (see: The China Study¬†or Why We Get Fat) .

Essentially, both parties are two sides of the same coin, bordering on Food Extremists. Food Extremist: Those believing their ideology on food and nutrition is the be all, end all for all modern disease, world problems, and that by doing so, set the world on a “sustainable” course.

There must be a middle ground in order to create lasting societal change. Is it not ok to eat both sustainably, humanely produced meat some days, and opt for vegan lifestyle on other days?  At the end of the day, we all want:

  • Improved transprancy in the food system
  • Improved farming and livestock practices that improve our own health and the welfare of the planet
  • Profitable business practices that also create positive health outcomes for the population
  • Solutions for the modern-day chronic diseases that burden society

I recently engaged John Durant, perhaps the preeminent caveman/blogger from hunter-gatherer.com, and advocate of the paleo diet and “living wild in the modern world” (see: Paleo Kick for 21 days) in a twitter talkback with Mark Bittman, NYT writer, cookbook author, and advocate for sustainable food and [occasional] veganism. I was surprised by the vitriol involved in the talk-back relating to which ideology was superior.

Let’s not be elitists about this! Afterall, ¬†we are all fighting the same fight against the SAD (Standard American Diet) and the current problems that task society. Can’t we all just hold hands and shop at the farmers market together?

I’ll leave you with a quote from the man himself, Michael Pollan:

“Eat food. Not too much. Mostly Plants.”

Now that’s something we should all agree on.

Always going for glory!

Craig E. Steinfeld

@CESteinfeld

Paleo kick for 21 days

16 Jan

I’m submerged in full on paleolithic, caveman onslaught for a solid 21 days. Eating nothing but meat, nuts, berries/fruit, vegetables, and the occasional mound of quinoa. Doing primal style workouts in minimalist shoes in the vein of crossfit. I have been consuming a diet extremely high in fat, not just any old fat, but “saturated” fat but low in sugar and any refined or processed products! I have not dared to even touch, or look at a piece of bread.

The goal:

To merely experiment without fear,

To test my own limits

To explore the human diet

To see how athletic performance is affected by the paleo craze

Paleo Resources:

Recipes :Paleo Meal Plan

Primal Blueprint

Robb Wolf: The Paleo Solution

AGG!

Craig Steinfeld

@CESteinfeld

I am not a resolution

5 Jan

I am not a resolution.

Rather,

I am motivated and driven, not by some ephemeral feeling or desire:

To lose weight

To be rich

To increase performance

To outsmart the competition

To succeed at all costs

To have that mansion on the hilltop

But rather,

To consistently and constantly

IMPROVE and

Do everything in my power

To live the life I choose and

To make the most of every second, of every day.

 

Always going for glory!

C.E. Steinfeld

@CEsteinfeld